Category Archives: Exhibitions

Next Meeting: Monday 18th November 5:00 – 6:00pm

Hi all,

The next Aboriginal Art Reading Group will be held next Monday the 18th of November from 5 – 6pm in room 307 of the John Medley Building.

In recognition of the current exhibition of bark paintings from the Leonhard Adam and Donald Thomson collections at the Ian Potter Museum of Art, the following short readings have been chosen:

Leonhard Adam,  “Has Australian Aboriginal Art a Future?”, Angry Penguins: Australian journal of literature and art, 1944, pp. 42 – 50.

Donald Thomson, “The Concept of ‘Marr’ in Arnhem Land’, Mankind, Vol. 10, Issue 1, June 1975, pp. 1–10.

We will also be discussing the recent issue of Broadsheet, ‘Let’s be polite about Aboriginal Art’. For more information see HERE

If you have trouble getting hold of any of the readings please contact me at susan.lowish[at]unimelb.edu.au

Hope to see you there,

Susan

Next Meeting: Monday 16th September 5:00 – 6:00pm

Hi all,

The next Aboriginal Art Reading Group will be held next Monday the 16th of September from 5 – 6pm in room 307 of the John Medley Building. The following short readings have been chosen:
Dayman, Karen “Jimmy Pike: there is more” Artlink Indigenous: Revisions vol 33 #2 2013 pg. 82 – 85.

Culpitt, Michelle “String Theory: Karen Mills” Artlink Indigenous: Revisions vol 33 #2 2013 pg. 94 – 95.

We will also be discussing the recent exhibition at the MCA String Theory, for more information see HERE

If you have trouble getting ahold of the readings please contact me at hameedm[at]student.unimelb.edu.au

Hope to see you there,

Monique

 

Next Meeting: Monday December 17th 4:15 – 5:15pm room 307

Greetings,

The next Aboriginal Art Reading Group will be held on the 17th of December at 4:15 in room 307 of the John Medley Building. We will be reading from the catalogue for SoF*ckinNative, an exhibition held at Blak Dot Gallery from 27th September – 13 October.

We will also be reading the foreword and conclusion and ‘Chapter One: Getting Started’ from Research is Ceremony: Indigenous Research Methods. (see attached).

If you are unable to get a copy of the catalogue, please contact me and I’ll try to organise something for you.

Hope to see you there!promoImage_fringe1

Next Meeting: Monday 19th November

Hi all,

The next meeting of the reading group will be next Monday 19th November in room 307 of the John Medley Building (University of Melbourne) from 4:15 – 5:15pm.

We have decided to read a chapter entitled “Coming to Matter: the Grounds of Our Embodied Difference” from Alison Ravenscroft’s book The Postcolonial Eye. Here is an excerpt from the blurb:

Informed by theories of the visual, knowledge and desire, The Postcolonial Eye is about the ‘eye’ and the ‘I’ in contemporary Australian scenes of race. Specifically, it is about seeing, where vision is taken to be subjective and shaped by desire, and about knowing one another across the cultural divide between white and Indigenous Australia. Writing against current moves to erase this divide and to obscure difference, Alison Ravenscroft stresses that modern Indigenous cultures can be profoundly, even bewilderingly, strange and at times unknowable within the terms of ‘white’ cultural forms. She argues for a different ethics of looking, in particular, for aesthetic practices that allow Indigenous cultural products, especially in the literary arts, to retain their strangeness in the eyes of the white subject.

We will also be looking at the exhibition Omission (22 Sept – 28 Oct) that was held at the Linden Centre for Contemporary Arts and curated by Glen Iseger-Pilkington. For more information about this exhibition (and some interviews with the artists) see here for more info: http://www.lindenarts.org/exhibitions/2012/omission.aspx

If you are unable to get a copy of the Ravenscroft reading, please get in contact hameedm[at]student.unimelb.edu.au

Image

image:
Michael Cook
Stickman #9
2011, inkjet print 40 x 100cm

I wish I was there.

Ancestral Modern: Australian Aboriginal Art from the Kaplan and Levi Collection opens at the Seattle Art Museum tomorrow. According to Will Owen, this event “promises to be one of the largest and most exciting museum exhibitions mounted in the US since Dreamings.” He is “totally psyched.” Read about it here. The exhibition website also has an image gallery.

Let’s see if we can get ahold of an exhibition catalog for an upcoming reading group!

This is the exhibition information that went out in the museum’s Enews:

Opening May 31
Finally, after over 50,000 years of making art, we are able to see what the oldest continuous culture on the planet has in mind. This art takes us into immense deserts and shimmering billabongs, into night skies and underground. What may look abstract is full of symbols and stories that take on common human dilemmas—greed, desire, the search for nourishment, and punishment of deceit. Most often, this art venerates the lands. We invite you to get lost in Australia this summer, without ever leaving Seattle.

Tjukurrtjanu Tour this Thursday

This Thursday we are going on a special reading group only tour of Tjukurrtjanu: Origins of Western Desert Art at the NGV Australia, Federation Square, with exhibition curators Judith Ryan and Philip Batty! If you’d like to join us please send me an email (or comment on this post – it will be private unless I approve it to be published).

Tjukurrtjanu: Origins of Western Desert Art Symposium, NGV

For more info about the exhibition, click here. For more about the symposium on 12 November click here. Info:

Tjukurrtjanu
Speakers Fred Myers, Silver Prof & Chair, Department of Anthropology, New York University; Dr Philip Batty, Senior Curator, Anthropology (Central Australia), Museum Victoria; Dick Kimber, historian & catalogue contributor; Prof Paul Carter, Chair in Creative Place Research, Deakin University; Paul Sweeney, Manager, Papunya Tula Artists; Bobby West Tjupurrula, Papunya Tula artist

A range of speakers will discuss the origins and evolution of the Western Desert Art movement. Continue reading

Saying No: Reconciling Spirituality and Resistance in Indigenous Australian Art

An exciting exhibition guest curated by Bindi Cole recently openned at the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Art in Brooklyn. For more about the exhibition click here or read below (information from their website):

On view: August 11 – November 6, 2011
Press Preview: September 22, 2011 6-7:00 PM
Opening Reception: September 22, 2011 7-9:00 PM
Guest curated by Bindi Cole

The word “No” does not exist in the majority of the over 200 Australian Aboriginal languages, and where it does exist, this powerful word is reserved for the elders and is used with great care and ceremony. As these languages reach the brink of extinction, indigenous Australian artists are using contemporary art to assert their identity and culture and say no to racism, land theft and colonialism in an urban world. With this, MoCADA announces the opening of the highly anticipated international group exhibition entitled, Saying No: Reconciling Spirituality and Resistance in Indigenous Australian Art.

The exhibition is guest curated by Bindi Cole, and will be on view from August 11 through November 6, Continue reading

25 May – 14 August Ricky Maynard: Portrait of a Distant Land at the Ian Potter Museum of Art, Melbourne Uni

Having recently returned from the Kluge-Ruhe Museum of Aboriginal Art at the University of Virgina’s exhibition Ricky Maynard: Portrait of a Distant Land, I am fortunate to see Ricky Maynard again; this time in Melbourne at the Ian Potter Museum of Art. The opening is next week: Wednesday, 25 May at 6:30pm, followed by a floor talk the next day, Thursday, 26 May with artist and curator, Keith Munro, at 1pm. RSVP requested: 8344 0327 or potter-events@unimelb.edu.au.

25 May 2011 to 14 Aug 2011
Exhibition organised and toured by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney
Curator: Keith Munro

Portrait of a distant land comprises a selection of 60 images from six bodies of work by leading Tasmanian documentary photographer Ricky Maynard, Continue reading

Reko Rennie @ Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection, University of Virginia

Exhibit curated by Stephen Gilchrist
January 28 – April 4, 2011

Video produced by Squid and Beard

Click here for more information about the exhibition.