Author Archives: Kira A. Randolph

June Meeting Cancelled

I hope to see you all next month!

Talk by Fred Myers @ ANU: “Disturbances in the Field: the Exhibition of Aboriginal Art in the U.S”

This sounds interesting for those of you in Canberra:

Professor Fred Myers will be giving a seminar titled: “Disturbances in the Field: the Exhibition of Aboriginal Art in the U.S.” at 9.30am on Wednesday 13th June in the Coombs Building in Seminar Room A. All are welcome.

I wish I was there.

Ancestral Modern: Australian Aboriginal Art from the Kaplan and Levi Collection opens at the Seattle Art Museum tomorrow. According to Will Owen, this event “promises to be one of the largest and most exciting museum exhibitions mounted in the US since Dreamings.” He is “totally psyched.” Read about it here. The exhibition website also has an image gallery.

Let’s see if we can get ahold of an exhibition catalog for an upcoming reading group!

This is the exhibition information that went out in the museum’s Enews:

Opening May 31
Finally, after over 50,000 years of making art, we are able to see what the oldest continuous culture on the planet has in mind. This art takes us into immense deserts and shimmering billabongs, into night skies and underground. What may look abstract is full of symbols and stories that take on common human dilemmas—greed, desire, the search for nourishment, and punishment of deceit. Most often, this art venerates the lands. We invite you to get lost in Australia this summer, without ever leaving Seattle.

Special meeting next Tuesday, 22 May 3:30pm, Ian Potter Museum

The next Aboriginal Art Reading Group meeting will be at the Ian Potter Museum at the University of Melbourne on Tuesday, 22 May, 3:30-4:30pm in the mezzanine level room. Curator Joanna Bosse will welcome the group with an introduction to a Groote Eylandt bark painting brought from the Leonhard Adam Collection archives especially for this event by newly appointed Curator of Academic Programs, Dr Heather Gaunt.

There will be two readings for the month of May, they are Stephanie Radok, “July,” in An Opening: Twelve Love Stories about Art, Wakefield Press, Kent Town, SA, 2012, pp. 62-80, and Djon Mundine, “A personal history of Aboriginal Art,” in Kasper Konig, Emily Joyce Evans and Falk Wolf (eds.) Remembering Forward: Australian Aboriginal painting since 1960, Paul Holberton Publishing, London, 2010.

Contact me if you would like to add your email address to our electronic mailing list. I use the mailing list to specify where to locate copies of the readings. Please note that we are meeting one hour earlier than usual, and on a Tuesday instead of our regular Monday. RSVPs would be appreciated for this meeting.

Image

Today at 1pm: Aboriginal Art’s digital future: current issues, new initiatives

University of Melbourne School of Culture and Communication Art History Seminar Programme, Old Physics G16 / Jim Potter Room, 1pm-2pm

“Aboriginal Art’s digital future: current issues, new initiatives,” Susan Lowish, Lecturer in Australian Art History, University of Melbourne

Recent developments in record keeping practices for Aboriginal art from remote communities represent significant changes to the amount and type of information being collected on individual artists and artworks. This paper outlines these changes and Continue reading

Talk on the 17th: Indigenous Research: By Us or About Us. What’s in it for us?

For more about this event, click here. Admission is free but tickets are required.

The Lin Onus Conversations Presented by The Wilin Centre for Indigenous Arts

Indigenous Research: By Us or About Us. What’s in it for us? Presented by the Wilin Centre for Indigenous Arts, the Lin Onus Conversations centre on Indigenous arts, histories and future directions, bringing leading practitioners and educators to the public. The Conversations are designed to foster collaboration and creative engagement between Indigenous and migrant peoples.

Join the conversation with guest speakers Professor Marcia Langton, Continue reading

Djon Mundine lecture, Same But Different: Things That Matter

Thursday,  19 April, 7:30pm at the Institute of Postcolonial Studies,  78-80 Curzon Street, North Melbourne. More info here.

I think of the present day Aboriginal condition and the struggle over the last twenty years as akin to the Stalin – Lenin/Trotsky divide in the 1920s and the 1930s. One wanted to consolidate communism in one state; the other to spread the revolution universally – to take it into the international. Colonisation, I think, rolls in a progression, Continue reading

April Meeting: Indigenous Australian Art Charter of Principles for Publicly Funded Collecting Institutions and Judith Ryan’s “The Ancient Made New”

The next Aboriginal Art Reading Group meeting will be Monday, 16 April, 4:30-5:30pm in room 215, John Medley Building, University of Melbourne.

There will be two readings for April: the Indigenous Australian Art Charter of Principles for Publicly Funded Collecting Institutions available from the Cultural Ministers Council publications page and Judith Ryan’s “The Ancient Made New,” Apollo: The International Magazine for Collectors, July/August 2011, that can be accessed through the University of Melbourne’s Discovery search.

Call for Papers

Australia and New Zealand Art Association Annual Conference, Sydney, 12-14 July 2012

Together <> Apart

 Relational Models of Curating and Art Making:  Local Histories and Indigenous Practices

The nature of contemporary biennales and large-scale recurring exhibitions is that they afford international curators, often from the global ‘North’, opportunities to arrive in cities and temporarily locate their practice within cultural contexts that can be new and unfamiliar.  This system produces and supports a whole spectrum of curatorial approaches, from the transitory implementation of pre-formed exhibition themes, to the close curatorial engagement with local histories, politics and ways of knowing.

The 18th Biennale of Sydney: all our relations ‘intends to focus on inclusionary practices of generative thinking, such as collaboration, conversation and compassion, in the face of coercion and destruction’ (de Zegher, 2011).  Continue reading

March Meeting: Katie Glaskin “On Dreams, Innovation and the Emerging Genre of the Individual Artist”

The next Aboriginal Art Reading Group meeting will be Monday, 19 March, 4:30-5:30pm in room 215, John Medley Building, University of Melbourne.

We will be reading Katie Glaskin (2010) “On Dreams, Innovation and the Emerging Genre of the Individual Artist,” Anthropological Forum: A journal of social anthropology and comparative sociology, 20:3, 251-267.

The article can be downloaded with a University of Melbourne student login via Discovery search.