Monthly Archives: February 2012

Call for Papers

Australia and New Zealand Art Association Annual Conference, Sydney, 12-14 July 2012

Together <> Apart

 Relational Models of Curating and Art Making:  Local Histories and Indigenous Practices

The nature of contemporary biennales and large-scale recurring exhibitions is that they afford international curators, often from the global ‘North’, opportunities to arrive in cities and temporarily locate their practice within cultural contexts that can be new and unfamiliar.  This system produces and supports a whole spectrum of curatorial approaches, from the transitory implementation of pre-formed exhibition themes, to the close curatorial engagement with local histories, politics and ways of knowing.

The 18th Biennale of Sydney: all our relations ‘intends to focus on inclusionary practices of generative thinking, such as collaboration, conversation and compassion, in the face of coercion and destruction’ (de Zegher, 2011).  Continue reading

March Meeting: Katie Glaskin “On Dreams, Innovation and the Emerging Genre of the Individual Artist”

The next Aboriginal Art Reading Group meeting will be Monday, 19 March, 4:30-5:30pm in room 215, John Medley Building, University of Melbourne.

We will be reading Katie Glaskin (2010) “On Dreams, Innovation and the Emerging Genre of the Individual Artist,” Anthropological Forum: A journal of social anthropology and comparative sociology, 20:3, 251-267.

The article can be downloaded with a University of Melbourne student login via Discovery search.

* Change of rooms

Our upcoming meeting on Monday, 20 February at 4:30pm will now be in the John Medley Building room 215.

February Meeting: Darren Jorgensen, “Dreams and Magic in Surrealism and Aboriginal Australian Art”

The next Aboriginal Art Reading Group meeting will be Monday, 20 February, 4:30-5:30pm in room 106, John Medley Building, University of Melbourne.

We will be reading Darren Jorgensen’s 2011 “Dreams and Magic in Surrealism and Aboriginal Australian Art,” Third Text, 25:2, 553-562. The article can be downloaded with a University of Melbourne student login via Discovery search on this page.

This article points to the confluence of dreams and magic in the discourses adopted by two very different art movements that emerged during the twentieth century. The first is French Surrealism, which adopted dreams and magic as a way of translating esoteric ideas to a global spectatorship. The second is the Australian Aboriginal art movement, which continues to use these ideas as ways of explaining cosmologies that remain alien to colonial Australia. Thus dreams and magic become means of cross-cultural translation but, more than this, they make a radical critique of Western materialism in both historical situations. In the aftermath of violent events, in the First World War and in the invasion of Australia, these concepts become ways of contemplating truths that exceed the flux of modernity. Ultimately, they point less to an art history constructed out of the specificity of historical change than to the strategic similarities of avant-gardes wanting to illuminate the potentials of human consciousness. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER]

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